Common Lisp, Development, LISP

Hacking Lisp in the Cloud, Pt. 3

Cloud9 -- New website and 3rd gen browser-based IDEToday Cloud9 announced the release of their new IDE to all customers. They also released their new website. The hiccups in the beta were all pretty minor, and were resolved quickly after reporting the bugs. Now, everyone can enjoy all the awesome new features.

The Cloud9 IDE supports more than 40 programming languages, Common Lisp included. As I mentioned in my previous post about the Beta, there are all sorts of new features that support a cleaner Lisp development cycle over the previous version—including auto-completion, file outline of top-level definition forms, custom runners, split-screen views, and more, all built on top of an Ubuntu workspace with sudo privileges. They’ve also streamlined the interface, collaboration tools, terminal, and over-all performance of the IDE.

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Common Lisp, Development, LISP

Hacking Lisp in the Cloud, Part 2

This morning I got access to the new Cloud9 IDE beta—and I have to say… WOW. It’s slicker, it’s faster, it’s more stable, auto-complete recognizes Lisp definition forms from your open workspace files such as defun and defmacro, and most importantly, it only takes seconds to get your workspace set up with RLWRAP, SBCL and Quicklisp.

The new Cloud9 IDE is running on an Ubuntu backend workspace. Cloud9 has had terminal access to your project workspace for quite some time now, but I’ve found the terminal experience to be significantly smoother in the new beta. It stays connected now, no longer timing-out on you when switching tabs or stepping away from the computer for a minute. Users can also use sudo for root access, and as a result install any debian package from apt (amongst many other things, of course). Emacs 24 is already installed by default. I suspect that SSH tunneling to a remote SWANK server from the Cloud9 workspace is also now possible.

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Common Lisp, Development, LISP

Hacking Lisp in the Cloud

The other day I stumbled upon a very interesting new online service for developers, Cloud9 IDE. Imagine Sublime Text, a test server with command-line access, version control, live chat, code-sharing and live collaboration, all bundled together in one convenient web app, allowing you and your team to work together seamlessly from anywhere with an internet connection. With Cloud9 IDE, that’s exactly what you get—and that’s just what comes with the free account.

The service seems primarily tailored to Node.js developers, but also includes out-of-the-box support for Python, Ruby, and PHP. Naturally I decided it would be worth the effort to see if I could get a Lisp installation up and running—and in the end it wasn’t particularly difficult. The one set-back is that your Project Workspace is running on a version of Red Hat that includes v2.12 of glibc, which means that unless you want to compile both glibc and sbcl from source yourself for every lisp project you have on Cloud9, the latest version of SBCL you can install from the binary release is 1.0.23. Not ideal, but at least it works.

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